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July 2016

15th annual Maine Lobster ride rolls into Camden (Video)

By | Coalition News, Events

This article originally appeared on WCSH6.com
Click here to watch the video
Justin Shrair, WCSH 9:59 PM. EST July 24, 2016

CAMDEN, Maine (NEWS CENTER) — Bikers have geared up for the the 15th annual Maine Lobster Ride.The ride raises money for the Bicycle Coalition of Maine – a non-profit organization that looks to protect both riders and pedestrians throughout the state. The ride is taking place Sunday in Camden.The new location of the bike ride – the Camden Snow Bowl where riders will be starting and finishing on Sunday.This year the ride features six different distance options from 15 miles all the way to 103 miles, all along the roads of Maine.According to Executive Director Nancy Grant this is their largest fundraiser.“This lobster ride which is in its 15th year, is our biggest fundraising event and so it’s a great opportunity for us to check in with our members, try to recruit more members, and also celebrate how beautiful it is to bicycle in this part of the state” said Grant.Some new additions to the ride this year include mountain biking, swimming live music and changed bike routes. About 900 riders are taking part. Copyright 2016 WCSH

When it comes to sharing the road, cyclists and motorists can be at odds

By | Coalition News

This article originally appeared on BangorDailyNews.com

Posted July 21, 2016, at 11:20 a.m.
Last modified July 21, 2016, at 1:59 p.m.

As president of Portland Velo Club, the state’s largest organized bicycle club, Ted Darling hears his share of bicycle-vehicle encounter stories. This week, for instance, a female member of the club sent him an email describing an unpleasant incident while riding her bicycle along Presumpscot Street in Portland.
“[The driver] was hauling a boat [and] yelling out the window at us,” the club member wrote. “When I caught up to him, he proceeded to call me plenty of derogatory names, then told me he was going to hit me.”
The incident ended peacefully, but Darling said he’s heard from other members saying they’ve had firecrackers thrown out of vehicles at them as they ride, they’ve been yelled at by motorists and had vehicles passing too close to them at high rates of speed — a practice cyclists often refer to as “being buzzed” by a car.
“How cyclists are treated on the road is variable [and] depends largely on where you are riding and the nature of the roads,” Darling said. “I think we at the Portland Velo Club have a heightened sense of riding safe, and we tend to ride in areas where bikes are commonly seen and drivers are aware we are out there.”
The club sponsors numerous group rides during the week, and Darling said each ride begins with a rundown on proper road cycling etiquette and Maine laws governing riding on public roadways. According to Maine law, bicycles must ride on the right-hand side of the road, with traffic; stay off sidewalks; and follow the rules of the road that also apply to motorized vehicles. For their part, drivers must give at least 3 feet between a cyclist and their vehicle when passing and maintain a safe distance from cyclists when coming upon them on the road.
“Yes, there are incidents that happen on the road all the time,” Jim Tasse, assistant director with the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, said. “A majority seem to come from the motorists wanting to get where they are going quickly and by being distracted.”
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Leg Work: Motorists want cyclists to wear bright clothes, follow traffic rules, pay attention

By | Coalition News

This article originally appeared on PressHerald.com
Twice in the past year, Patrick Moody says he came inches away from hitting cyclists who were biking at night in dark clothes. Once, Moody was turning onto Portland’s Forest Avenue when a cyclist on the wrong side of the road headed straight at him, weaving from the bike lane into traffic.
“He looked like he was not with it,” said Moody, who is manager of public affairs for AAA Northern New England. Moody had only a split-second to react. “That scared the hell out of me,” he said.
Cyclists who startle drivers and risk their own safety by darting in and out of traffic, riding in the wrong direction and otherwise acting unpredictably were a major concern expressed in my recent, informal survey about bicyclist-motorist interactions. About 40 people throughout Maine responded to the survey. Most drive a car and ride a bike, so they see roadway issues from both perspectives.
“It seems like some bicyclists have taken on the attitude that they have more rights to the road than those in cars,” Leslie Ohmart III of Brewer wrote. “They ride on sidewalks, ignore stop signs, run red lights, cross lanes with little or no signal and generally act like traffic laws do not apply to them.” Read More

Walk-n-Roll Bangor and the Bicycle Coalition of Maine install River City Trail Signage in Downtown Bangor

By | Coalition News

This article originally appeared on BangorDailyNews.com

Posted July 15, 2016, at 4:28 p.m.
Last modified July 18, 2016, at 9:59 a.m.

BANGOR, Maine – July 15, 2016 – Local pedestrian and bicycle group Walk-n-Roll Bangor announced recently the installation of identifying trail signage for pedestrians and bicyclists through the heart of downtown Bangor. This project is a demonstration to promote access to points of interest and recreation. It is Walk-n-Roll’s hope that such signage can be made permanent.
Christened the River City Trail and paid for by the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, Walk-n-Roll began sign installation in early July. The route stretches more than two miles through five economic hubs in the city’s downtown district. More than 50 signs in black and white are placed on street and lamp posts through Norumbega Park, West Market Square, Pickering Square, Waterfront Park and Cross Insurance Center. The route includes a main path, a scenic route and a spur for bicyclists to Brewer via the Chamberlain Bridge. Walk-n-Roll proposed the concept to city staff and councilors in May, and it was approved in late June. The project also was shared with Downtown Bangor Partnership and the state of Maine.
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Bicycle classes help Maine refugees get around town

By | Coalition News

This article originally appeared on marketplace.org
Riding a bike, for some people, is strictly recreational. For others, it’s a necessity.
If you don’t own a car, either because it’s cost-prohibitive, or because your immigration status – like being undocumented or an asylum seeker – creates a lengthy wait for a license, bicycling can be both a necessity and fun.
In Portland, Maine, there’s a class called Bikes for All Mainers where people are learning mechanics, maintenance and traffic safety. The classes, which are open to anyone, are held at the Portland Gear Hub, a nonprofit bike shop, and are in partnership with the Bicycle Coalition of Maine. They are so popular that there is a waiting list.
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William Oscar Emery Drive now striped for biking, walking

By | Coalition News

This article originally appeared on fosters.com
SANFORD – New white-striped bike lanes on William Oscar Emery Drive are a temporary installation demonstrating a low-cost method of improving safety for cyclists and walkers, according to the Bicycle Coalition of Maine (BCM).
The lanes were striped on Thursday, June 30, along a quarter-mile stretch of road wide enough to allow a dedicated bike lane in each direction while still accommodating two lanes of traffic and parking on both sides of the road.
“This is also a great opportunity to promote a healthy and active lifestyle,” said Lenny Horr, an avid cyclist and chairman of the Sanford Planning Board.
Horr attracted BCM to Sanford by writing a successful application for technical assistance. The striping is paid for by BCM and will wear off after a few months. During that time, feedback from the public is being solicited through on-site observation and an online survey at https://bikemaine.org/demosurvey .
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Input sought for Sanford’s temporary bike lane

By | Coalition News

This article originally appeared on JournalTribune.com

Input sought for Sanford’s temporary bike lane

By LIZ GOTTHELF
Staff Writer

Representatives from the City of Sanford’s planning board and the Bicycle Coalition of Maine painted a temporary bicycle lane on William Oscar Emery Drive Thursday morning. LIZ GOTTHELF/Journal Tribune SANFORD — A temporary bicycle lane is in place on William Oscar Emery Drive, and the Bicycle Coalition of Maine would like to know what residents think about it.
The white lane designating it for bicycle use on the side of the road adjacent to Number One Pond was painted Thursday morning and paid for by the Bicycle Coalition of Maine.
Jim Tasse, assistant director of the Bicycle Coalition, said the lines will be on the road until early August, when the street is repaved.
The temporary bicycle lane is part of the bike coalition’s “Imagine People Here” campaign, through which the organization works with municipalities to install temporary infrastructure to demonstrate the value of designated bicycle and pedestrian space.
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