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2018 Day 1 – Presque Isle to Caribou

By | BikeMaine
Bike Maine 2019 Coastal Connections logo

2018 Day 1 – Presque Isle to Caribou

“And they’re off!”

Presque Isle to Caribou

The BikeMaine 2018 route begins by heading east to Fort Fairfield, which is located along the Canada–

US border and features the Potato Blossom Festival in mid-July. From there, we travel north to Limestone, a small Maine community that is home to the #1 ranked high school in Maine (Maine School of Science and Mathematics), the #1 largest industrial park in Maine at Loring Commerce Centre, the #1 ranked best tasting public drinking water in Maine, and the #1 ranked most affordable place to live in Maine. Our final destination for the day is Collins Pond Park in Caribou, the most northeastern city in the United States.


Caribou:

The City of Caribou is not only the most northeastern city in the United States; it sits as the central jewel in the Crown of Maine, Aroostook County. Located 345 miles NE of Boston, Caribou boasts four seasons, three nations (America, Canada, and the Aroostook Band of Micmacs), two languages (English and French), and one fantastic way of life! If you love the outdoors, adventure, and a collaborative community, you will love the 80 square miles that we call home on Day 1!

Although lumberjacks and trappers first came to Caribou in the early 1800s, it wasn’t until 1859 that this corner of The County was incorporated. In the 1890s, Caribou saw an influx of settlers and the establishment of the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad. This helped create a booming agricultural export business, making Caribou a worldwide name in the potato growing and shipping industries, and cementing our proud farming heritage. Today, Caribou and Aroostook County farmers plant approximately 60,000 acres of potatoes and have become known as the largest grower of broccoli on the East Coast. In addition to farming, Caribou industries include medical, information technology, comprehensive customer care companies, wood products, and some pretty amazing home-grown entrepreneurs!

Caribou is also famous for its weather: mild summers, charming autumns, and impressive winters. If you aren’t familiar with a Northern Maine winter, it should definitely be on your bucket list. Around here, folks brag about below-zero temps, Nor’easter storms, and accumulated snowfall. It’s a challenge to which they rise by and grabbing their skis or firing up their snowmobiles. Did you know northern Maine is home to over 2,300 miles of snowmobile trails? But it’s not all about snow! The trails are all-season – meaning ATV, mountain bike, and even horseback enthusiasts can experience life off the beaten path. Wildlife and untouched wilderness create a world of wonderment! Life in Caribou is an experience you won’t soon forget.

Be sure to spend some time in town and try one of the locally owned restaurants, unique shops, or City events. The summer series, “Thursdays on Sweden Street,” offers live music, food trucks, and craft vendors. The Caribou Days celebration in August combines the local affinity for heritage with community pride, and of course fireworks! From Winter Carnival in February to holiday events in December, you’ll never be bored in the City of Caribou!

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2018 Menu

By | BikeMaine
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2018 Menu

Saturday, September 8th

Dinner- Presque Isle

  • Deconstructed Herbed Beef Kabobs with Pepper, Onions, Squash
  • Vegetarian: Veggie Kabobs w/Tempeh
  • Colcannon
  • Purple Cauliflower
  • Tangy Orzo and Corn Salad
  • Tossed Salad with two dressings
  • Crusty Bread
  • Biscuit and Mixed Berries
  • Served with Fresh Whipped Cream
  • Fruit Infused Water & Cider
  • MFSC Mocktail
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Sunday, September 9th

Breakfast- Presque Isle

  • Baked French Toast w/Northern Maine Maple Syrup & Blueberry Compote
  • Maine-Cured Bacon
  • Roasted Morning Potatoes
  • Hot Whole Grain Oatmeal Accompanied by Fruits, Brown Sugar, and Sweet Butter
  • Farm Fresh Yoghurt Plus a variety of toppings, including granola
  • Variety of Whole Fruit
  • Orange Juice & Cider
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

Lunch- Limestone

  • Limestone Deli Platter: Locally Roasted Turkey, Country Ham, Sliced Assorted Cheeses
  • Lettuce, Tomato, Onion
  • Condiments
  • Chicken Noodle Soup
  • Vegetarian Chili (v)
  • Garden Salad w/ assorted dressings
  • Rolls & Butter
  • Potato Bar Station
  • Mixed Berry Shortcake
  • Fresh Fruit
  • Lemonade
  • Assorted sparkling waters

Dinner- Caribou

  • Acadian Slow Roasted Pork Loin
  • Pan-fried Trout  with Brown Butter side
  • Cornbread muffins
  • Vegetarian: Grilled Portabella
  • Gingered Sweet Potato
  • Roasted Golden Beets
  • Warmed Broccoli & Chickpea salad
  • Tossed Green Salad + Raspberry Vinaigrette
  • Blueberry Cobbler GF w/Houlton Dairy Ice Cream
  • Fruit Infused Water (Blueberry, Lemon, Cucumber)
  • Blueberry lemonade
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Monday, September 10th

Breakfast- Caribou

  • Breakfast Burrito Bar
  • Including Scrambled eggs), mushrooms, fresh salsa, shred artisan cheese, spinach, local fresh ham, diced tomatoes, pan roasted Caribou Russet potatoes, Tortillas
  • Caribou Molasses & Apple Cider Donuts
  • Overnight Yoghurt / Oatmeal Combo, Served with Granola
  • Assorted Fresh Fruit
  • Assorted Juice
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

Lunch- Van Buren

  • Fresh Pasta Bar
  • Meatballs
  • Marinara (v)
  • Grated Parmesan
  • Mini rolls with herbed olive oil
  • Seasonal vegetable soup (v)
  • Potato Bar Station
  • Tossed Seasonal Salad accompanied by assorted dressings
  • Assorted Beverages
  • Variety of Local Grown Apples
  • Assorted Desserts
  • Variety of Cookies
  • Acadian Whoopie Pies

Dinner- Madawaska (On Your Own)

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Tuesday, September 11th

Breakfast- Madawaska (On Your Own)

Lunch- Madawaska (On Your Own)

Dinner- Madawaska

  • Tourtiere Pie
  • Pate Chinois
  • Vegetarian: Stuffed Cabbage Topped with a roasted tomato compote
  • Basmati Rice
  • Sauteed Green Beans w/shallots
  • Old Fashioned Green Scallion Salad w/sour cream dressing
  • Fresh Tossed Salad served with Raspberry Vinaigrette
  • Assorted Pickled Vegetables
  • Homemade Rolls
  • Sweet Ploye Bar w/strawberry and cinnamon sugar
  • Mini Root Beer Floats
  • Fruit Infused Water
  • Fresh Brewed Iced Tea
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas
  • MFSC Mocktail

    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Wednesday, September 12th

Breakfast- Madawaska

  • Local Hard Boiled Oeufs
  • Artisan Bacon
  • Sausage Links
  • Roasted Potatoes
  • Assorted muffins and homemade toast accompanied by preserves and butter
  • Farm Fresh Yoghurt plus a variety of toppings, including granola
  • Hot Native Grown Oatmeal accompanied by Fruits, Brown Sugar, and Sweet Butter
  • Fresh Cut Fruit
  • Fruit Juice
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

Lunch- St. Agatha

  • Sandwich Selection
  • Ham, Turkey, or Tuna Salad
  • Cheddar Cheese & Provolone
  • Accompanied by Mustard, Mayo, Lettuce
  • White/Wheat Bread, Wraps, Rolls
  • Vegetarian Soup (v, gf, df)
  • Rotini Pasta Salad
  • Potato Bar Station
  • Kettle Style Potato Chips
  • Brownies
  • Pumpkin Bars
  • Apples & Bananas
  • Sparkling Water Flavored
  • Iced Tea

Dinner- Fort Kent

  • Pit Roasted Chicken
  • Vegetarian: Garlic Spaghetti Squash with Black Beans & Spinach
  • Mashed Potatoes w/Chives
  • Sweet Corn on the Cob
  • Country Rolls
  • Sauteed hearty greens
  • Caesar Salad with Croutons on Side
  • Chocolate Bread Pudding
  • Topped with vanilla ice cream and caramel Irish cream sauce
  • Fruit Infused Water
  • Fresh Brewed Iced Tea
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Thursday, September 13th

Breakfast- Fort Kent

  • Piperade (poached egg classic with sauteed tomato, peppers, onions)
  • Ployes with Creton
  • Maine Cured Bacon
  • Classic Biscuits with Butter
  • Farm Fresh Yoghurt plus a variety of toppings, including granola
  • Hot Native Grown Oatmeal accompanied by Fruits, Brown Sugar, and Sweet Butter
  • Variety of Whole Fruit
  • Fruit Juice
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

Lunch- Allagash

  • Allagash River Wraps and Rolls
  • Chicken Salad
  • Egg Salad
  • Variety of Sliced Cheeses
  • Assorted Condiments
  • Vegetable Platter
  • Lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles
  • Potato Salad
  • Assorted Chips
  • Acadian Wedding Soup
  • Quinoa & Sweet Potato Chili with Beans (vg, gf, df)
  • Potato Bar Station
  • Assorted Fruit
  • Variety of sweets, including sheet cake
  • Beverages

Dinner- Fort Kent

  • Smoked Brisket w/Acadian Dry Rub, accompanied by a grilled corn chutney
  • Vegetarian: Potato Gnocchi w/ Marinara
  • Cornbread
  • French Canadian Bean-Hole Beans (some vegetarian)
  • Honey Roasted Carrots
  • Braised Brussel Sprouts
  • Mixed Green Salad with pickled beets side, served with maple balsamic vinaigrette, tangy yoghurt dressing
  • Strawberry Shortcake topped with semi-sweet whipped cream
  • Fruit Infused Water
  • Fresh Brewed Iced Tea
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas
  • SPECIAL: Classic Poutine Station

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Friday, September 14th

Breakfast- Fort Kent

  • Selection of Quiches including Sausage, Sharp Cheddar, Mushroom, Onion, and Havarti
  • Cured Breakfast Ham Slices
  • Pan-fried Shred Potatoes
  • Fresh Croissants with preserved and whipped butter and preserves
  • Wild-Blueberry Yoghurt Smoothie
  • Hot Native Grown Oatmeal accompanied by Fruits, Brown Sugar, and Sweet Butter
  • Whole Fresh Fruit
  • Orange Juice
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

Lunch- Grand Isle

  • Verna’s Acadian Chicken & Dumpling Stew
  • Bean Soup (v)
  • Tossed Salad w/ Sides
  • Pulled Chicken
  • Tomato
  • Cucumber
  • Peppers
  • Other Vegetables & Sides
  • 2 Dressings
  • Assorted Rolls
  • Whole Fruit
  • Potato Bar Station
  • Assorted Scratch Cookies
  • Lemonade
  • Ice Tea

Dinner- St. Agatha

  • County Lobster Bake
  • Option (Limited Quantity): Grilled Local Sausage, Kraut, & Stone Ground Mustard
  • Vegetarian: Stuffed Zucchini
  • Butter & Sugar Corn on the Cob
  • Bi-Color Cole-Slaw
  • Roasted Potato Wedges
  • Biscuits & Flint Corn Bread
  • Whoopie Pies & Chocolate Cookies
  • Fruit Infused Water
  • Fresh Brewed Iced Tea
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assort Teas

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Saturday, September 15th

Breakfast- St. Agatha

  • Choice of House-Made Stratas (Meat and Vegetarian Options)
  • Lakeview’s Baked Beans
  • Grilled Shredded Home Fries
  • Variety of Breakfast Breads
  • Farm Fresh Yoghurt, plus a variety of toppings, including granola
  • Hot Native Grown Oatmeal accompanied by Fruits, Brown Sugar, and Sweet Butter
  • Assorted Muffins
  • Fresh Whole Fruit
  • Assorted Juice
  • Bold Coast Coffee
  • Assorted Teas

Lunch- Presque Isle

  • Hand Crafted Wood Fired Pizzas – Toppings include:
  • Seasonal Vegetables, Meatballs, Mashed Potatoes, Tomato Sauce, Olive Oil, Cheese
  • Locally Sourced Salad served with Blueberry Balsamic Vinaigrette
  • Artisan Style Dessert
  • The County Ice Tea
  • Blueberry Lemonade
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Volunteer

By | BikeMaine
Bike Maine 2019 Coastal Connections logo

Volunteer

BikeMaine Volunteers photo

Join the BikeMaine Volunteer Team, and lend your skills and talents to the success of this awesome event! Are you interested in participating in BikeMaine but not interested in riding? Do you like the idea of spending a week in Maine during early September on a “service vacation?” Are you living in or near one of the host communities and want to learn more about how to help showcase your community? Whatever the reason, you have come to the right place!

The Bicycle Coalition of Maine depends on the help and expertise of many volunteers to make BikeMaine a success. Volunteers are needed before, during, and after BikeMaine. They are key to advancing 450 bicycle riders safely across 350+ miles of Maine roads, and are integral in each day’s celebrations.

Volunteers are every bit as important to BikeMaine as the riders, and we know our volunteers have just as much fun as the participants riding the route each day. BikeMaine volunteers are critical to the success of the event and to laying the foundation upon which its reputation will be built for years to come. Join this super-fun team of volunteers from all over the U.S., and enjoy the volunteer experience of a lifetime!


Below is a list of the volunteer positions and a brief description of each job. Do you have a professional certification, license or skill you would like to share with us (e.g. chef, commercial driver’s license, EMT, ham radio operator)? Please contact us for more information about any of these and other volunteer needs.

  • SAG Driver (Provides on-route support to cyclists)
  • Bike Route Flagger (Alerts cyclists to hazards, turns, alternate routes and conditions)
  • Tent and Porter Team (Provides luggage delivery and tent set-up and take-down services for riders purchasing Tent & Porter Service)
  • Information Services Team (Provides information for riders and volunteers at each of the villages we will be staying in)
  • Village Site Team (Responsible for setting up and taking down the BikeMaine Village)
  • Route Sign Team (Marks and sets signs along each day’s route so cyclists can navigate)
  • Bike Route Sweep (Ensures that all cyclists are off the route at the end of the day; removes signs from the course)
  • Luggage Team (Helps manage luggage for riders; loads and unloads luggage from trucks)
  • Lunch & Rest Stops (Welcomes cyclists to rest or lunch stops and provides snacks and beverages to cyclists on the route)

Please fill out the digital form below to join the team!

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

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About BikeMaine

By | BikeMaine
Bike Maine 2019 Coastal Connections logo

About Bike Maine

History

Founded in 2012, BikeMaine was organized by the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, an advocacy group that has led the effort to make Maine better for biking and walking since 1992. BikeMaine was founded to promote the state as a bicycling destination and to use cycling as an economic development tool for local communities. The inaugural BikeMaine event was held in September 2013 and attracted 251 riders from 37 states and Canadian provinces and generated an estimated $235,000 in direct economic impact.

GIVING BACK

About BikeMaine photoWherever possible, purchased resources required for riders are Maine-sourced within host communities or businesses along the route. The economic boost to host community businesses and community organizations from riders, volunteers, and family members can be significant, as are the continuing benefits from increased community visibility. In 2017, BikeMaine’s total direct economic impact from the event to date grew to an estimated $2.3 million. Proceeds from the event support the Bicycle Coalition of Maine and its local cycling and pedestrian initiatives.

Following the completion of BikeMaine’s three-year start-up phase, BikeMaine awarded its first grant in support of biking infrastructure to the City of Gardner, BikeMaine 2014 host community, in 2016. Gardiner is using the $12,300 grant to attract matching funds to complete a connector trail from its downtown to the Kennebec River Trail. The second round of grants were awarded in 2017: $2,705 to Bath (2014 Host Community) and $4,000 to Washington County Council of Governments (2016 Region).

About BikeMaine photoBath used the funding to construct a “pump” track in a vacant lot between Bath Middle School and the Bath Skate Park. A “pump” track is a small, looping course of banked turns and other features, designed to be ridden without pedaling. Instead, riders gain momentum by “pumping” with up and down movements on the bicycle. The track has been equipped with 30 high-quality bicycles and helmets, as well as tools and supplies for maintenance.

Washington County Council of Governments is using the funding to place public bicycle repair tool kits at automobile service stations along the Bold Coast Scenic Bikeway, a new, world-class, 300-mile, bicycle route that winds through 30 communities from the Schoodic Peninsula to Eastport, and connects via the East Coast Greenway and US Bicycle Route 1 to Calais and the Canadian Maritimes.

STAFF

BikeMaine is hosted by the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, and operates under the direction of a Ride Director and volunteer Ride Committee. Most importantly, it is fueled by an army of volunteers, many from host communities and communities interested in becoming host communities in the future. You can learn more about the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, staff, and staff support here. If you’d like to learn more about becoming a volunteer, please click here.

 

Ride Director, MaryBeth Luce

MaryBeth photoMaryBeth was born and raised in western Maine. After attending college in Indiana, working in Connecticut, and spending time in Colorado, she moved back to Maine with her husband in 2006 to raise their family here. MaryBeth started with the Coalition as the Office Administrator in February 2016. In December 2017, she transitioned into the role of Ride Director, putting into action the decade of event management experience she brings with her.

 


Event Coordinator, Will Elting

Will photoWill has always loved adventures outdoors, whether it’s hiking New Hampshire’s 4,000 footers, sailing the coast of the Baja peninsula, or cycling the length of the Erie Canal in his home state of New York. He has a BS in Parks, Recreation and Ecotourism from Unity College, a graduate certificate in Nonprofit Management from USM, and a decade of experience working with recreation focused nonprofits. He and his wife Emily live on Portland’s Munjoy Hill, where they can frequently be seen riding their tandem bike.

 


Volunteer Coordinator, Liz Hall

Liz photoLiz is the Bicycle Coalition of Maine’s Development Director, and has the honor of serving as the volunteer coordinator for the BikeMaine ride each year! Liz hails originally from Vermont, and after a stint in Washington, DC, has loved settling into her new home in Maine and discovering so many amazing places to ride and people to befriend throughout the state. During BikeMaine, you’ll find Liz dancing around the BikeMaine Village, lending a hand wherever needed, and working to make BikeMaine the best experience imaginable for our amazing volunteers!

Ride Committee

The Board of the Bicycle Coalition of Maine appointed Coalition members to serve on the BikeMaine Ride Committee, which began meeting in December 2011.

 

Ride Committee Members include:

  • Tina West, Chair: Yarmouth
  • Margaret Bean, Vice Chair: Belgrade
  • Aaron Bishop, Treasurer: Falmouth
  • Pam Fischer: New Gloucester
  • Phil Coffin: Portland
  • John Williams: Bicycle Coalition of Maine Executive Director
  • Rick McGinley: Falmouth
  • Larry Rubinstein: Scarborough
  • Alicia Heyburn: Brunswick
  • Jeremy Lindberg: Freeport
  • Emily Elting: Portland
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2019 Lodging Options

By | BikeMaine
Bike Maine 2019 Coastal Connections logo

For those who want a night away from the campsite, here is a map of hotels and other lodging options close to each BikeMaine village.

Any transportation required between the BikeMaine Village and off-site lodging will need to be worked out between you and your lodging management. Riders who elect to spend a night outside of the BikeMaine Village are responsible for their own luggage; BikeMaine does not have the capacity to monitor luggage overnight.

For a complete worry-free experience, bike travel specialist Summer Feet offers a BikeMaine lodging package that includes accommodations fees and transportation to and from each property.

Please note that while BikeMaine is willing to make riders aware of non-camping lodging options, BikeMaine makes no representation about the quality of the properties or service provided.

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FAQs

By | BikeMaine
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FAQs

Below we’ve addressed some questions you may have. It’s also possible you have questions we haven’t addressed, and if so, please contact us and we’ll do our best to get you the information you need.

About BikeMaine

How many cyclists will be on the BikeMaine ride?

BikeMaine is limited to 450 riders. We keep it small for a number of reasons, including our goal of creating an intimate quality experience, and making sure we don’t overwhelm our host communities.

What are the dates for BikeMaine? How do I register?

BikeMaine 2019: Coastal Connections will be held September 7 – 14, 2019.

The 2019 event is sold out. If you wish to be added to the wait list, please send your name, email address, and phone number to ride@bikemaine.org.

 

What is Tent & Porter Service?

For an additional fee, you can choose to have a spacious tent for two set up and waiting for you upon your arrival in each day’s BikeMaine Village, with your luggage delivered to your door and two camp chairs ready for you to relax. The fee is $500for single occupancy, an additional $50 for double occupancy, and includes an L.L.Bean tent, and two camp chairs. You’ll need to bring your own sleeping bag and pad.

What are the sleeping accommodations? What if I don’t like to camp?

Cyclists can opt to bring and set up their own tent, or they can utilize the convenient Tent & Porter service for an additional fee.

Riders can also make their own arrangements to stay in nearby hotels or bed and breakfasts, and local options for each town have been provided on the 2019 Lodging Page. Any transportation required between the BikeMaine Village and offsite lodging will need to to be worked out between you and your lodging management. Riders who elect to spend a night outside of the BikeMaine Village are responsible for their own luggage; BikeMaine does not have the capacity to monitor luggage overnight.

For a complete worry-free experience, you can let bike travel specialist Summer Feet make all of your lodging accommodations. Summer Feet offers a BikeMaine lodging package that includes accommodations and transportation between the BikeMaine Village and the lodging property.

Please note that while BikeMaine is willing to make riders aware of non-camping lodging options, BikeMaine makes no representation about the quality of the properties or service provided.

What is BikeMaine’s purpose?

Founded in 2012, BikeMaine was organized by the Bicycle Coalition of Maine, an advocacy group that has led the effort to make Maine better for biking and walking since 1992. BikeMaine was founded to promote  Maine as a bicycling destination and to use cycling as an economic development tool for local communities. Proceeds from the event support BikeMaine host communities and the Bicycle Coalition of Maine’s cycling and pedestrian initiatives.

Following the completion of BikeMaine’s three-year start-up phase, BikeMaine awarded its first grant in support of biking infrastructure to the City of Gardner, BikeMaine 2014 host community, in 2016. Gardiner is using the $12,300 grant to attract matching funds to complete a connector trail from its downtown to the Kennebec River Trail. The second round of grants were awarded in 2017: $2,705 to Bath (2014 Host Community) and $4,000 to Washington County Council of Governments (2016 Region).

Bath used the funding to construct a pump track in a vacant lot between Bath Middle School and the Bath Skate Park. A pump track is a small, looping course of banked turns and other features, designed to be ridden without pedaling. Instead, riders gain momentum by pumping with up and down movements on the bicycle. The track has been equipped with 30 high-quality bicycles and helmets, as well as tools and supplies for maintenance.

Washington County Council of Governments is using the funding to place public bicycle repair tool kits at automobile service stations along the Bold Coast Scenic Bikeway, a new, world-class, 300-mile, bicycle route that winds through 30 communities from the Schoodic Peninsula to Eastport, and connects via the East Coast Greenway and US Bicycle Route 1 to Calais and the Canadian Maritimes.

 

Registration

I just registered and am so excited! Now what?

Thanks for registering to ride BikeMaine with us! You should have received an automated receipt of your BikeMaine registration “order” emailed to the address you included in your registration. If you did not, please email us or call 207-623-4511.

Next steps?

  1. Read through all of the FAQs. If you still have questions, be in touch!
  2. Read emails from us! You should be receiving monthly emails with news and information that you should read in their entirety.
  3. Check us out and start following us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube for your daily or weekly dose of #BikeMaine excitement!
  4. Get outfitted! BikeMaine merchandise  is available for purchase now.
  5. Start training. See the example training program designed by our sports therapy partner OA Centers for Orthopaedics, a Division of Spectrum Medical Group, please click here.

I can no longer ride. Can I transfer my registration to someone else?

No. Registration is not transferable, and  you will  be asked to show a photo ID when you check in on September 7th.  

See “What if I registered for BikeMaine, but now have to cancel?

I am on the wait-list. What now?

Hold tight. If there are cancellations, the next person on the wait-list will be notified by phone or email as soon as possible.

We are not able to predict when or if this will happen.

Want to make sure that you are signed up for BikeMaine? Mark your calendar – Registration for the 2020 ride will open in September.

What if I registered for BikeMaine, but now have to cancel?

In the event that you have to cancel your registration, there will be a sliding scale for refunds. Riders who cancel before June 1st will be refunded all but $50. Those who cancel between June 1 and July 31st will be refunded all but $150. Beginning August 1, no refunds will be granted, regardless of the reason for cancellation.

To protect yourself from unexpected disruptions in your BikeMaine plans, we suggest that you consider travel insurance. Here is an example of a travel policy that is available.

Can a non-rider come with me?

Yes. Many riders have family and friends who wish to share the experience of the event but prefer to ride from village to village in their own car rather than on a bicycle. For these folks, we have the Rider Guest Program. The fee is $700, which includes 6 dinners and 6 breakfasts, and all of the other BikeMaine Village amenities (camping, showers, entertainment). Rider Guests are asked not to drive the same route the riders take each day. BikeMaine will provide alternative driving directions for Rider Guests. Space for rider guests is limited, so register here early.

What does my registration fee include?

Your registration fee includes:

  • 3 hearty,  locally-sourced  meals each day, with the exception that riders are on their own for  dinner, breakfast, and lunch when we are in the layover community, where there is a wide array of restaurants and markets available
  • Well-stocked rest stops for recharging and refueling
  • Friendly course support that includes maps, a signed route, support vehicles, and mechanical and medical assistance, if needed
  • Luggage transport (up to 2 bags, with no one bag weighing over 35 pounds)
  • Full use of the BikeMaine Village, a portable tent city that springs up wherever the tour stops for the night
  • Hot showers on site
  • Restrooms
  • Daily entertainment
  • Bike mechanics, and medical and information tents
  • A gathering place for cyclists to socialize and swap stories from the road
  • A BikeMaine t-shirt

Do I have to ride the whole week? Is there a shorter option?

BikeMaine no longer offers half-week riding options. BikeMaine 2019 is sold out. If you wish to be added to the wait list, please  send your name, email address, and phone number to ride@bikemaine.org.

 

Preparing for the Ride

What kind of bicycle do I need to ride BikeMaine?

One in good working condition! Most riders will ride road bikes with drop-style curved handlebars, but touring or hybrid bikes with straight bars are just fine, too, as are recumbents and tandems. What’s most important is that you’re comfortable and that your bike will hold up through multiple days of riding.

If you are in the market for a bike, we encourage you to visit a bike shop in your area and explain that, during BikeMaine, the bike will  be used for riding an average of 55  miles a day on paved Maine roads (translation: expect the occasional potholes and cracks).   No need to carry luggage (as baggage service is included in your registration), but the bike should be light enough that you can be comfortable climbing about 2500-4000 feet a day.

That being said you may look to rent a bike in the area and not worry about  bringing (or shipping) your own bike with you, and that is perfectly fine. You know your body and how you will adjust to a new bicycle better than we do!

PREPARE YOUR BIKE: If you are bringing your own bike, please please please have it inspected at your local bike shop. This will reduce the chances of having mechanical problems along the route. A tune-up is a must whether you do it yourself or have a mechanic do it for you. We (and the past BikeMaine bike mechanics) strongly encourage you to schedule a Professional Bike Tune-up and have your mechanic inspect the bike thoroughly, clean and re-grease all cable pinch bolts, saddle rail clamp and bolts, and the seat-post collar bolts, replacing worn out parts if necessary. If your shop has or can order your bike’s specific rear derailleur hanger, buy one as a spare and bring it with you. If you have any nontraditional wheel spokes that are integrated into the manufacturers hub and rims, it never hurts to have those on hand for the bike mechanics  to install, if need be. We want you and your bike to ride the whole route!

Do you offer towel service?

Yes. Towel service, which gets you a freshly laundered towel each day of BikeMaine, is available for an additional fee of $40 per person. Sign-up  for towel service by August 1st.

How serious is the weight limit for bags? Can I bring two bags instead of one?

Each rider may bring no more than two bags (duffle or cargo bags are ideal). No one bag may exceed 35 pounds. This weight limit includes your tent and sleeping bag. The weight restriction is in consideration of the volunteers who must handle the luggage. Please take the time to weigh your bag(s) and pack accordingly. All luggage will be weighed at check-in and any single bag weighing more than 35 pounds will need to be adjusted. No exceptions.

In the event of rainy weather, your luggage may sit uncovered outdoors for some period of time (while we will do what we can to keep luggage dry, we cannot guarantee that luggage won’t get wet). We highly recommend that you use waterproof luggage or bring heavy duty trash bags to wrap your luggage if rain is in the forecast. Past riders recommend using ziplock bags for items inside your luggage, and lining the inside of your bags with heavy duty trash bags for extra protection, to ensure your possessions remain dry.

What do I need to bring?

Needs and wants are different and this is a good opportunity to create the distinction. To assist with your packing, we’ve created a packing list that will be available when the Rider Handbook is published later this spring. Remember that this list is just a suggestion, and keep in mind the weight  limit for your 2 bags, including tent and sleeping bag, when packing. No one bag may weigh more than 35 pounds. All bags will be weighed at check-in and any bag exceeding the 35 pound weight limit will need to be adjusted. No exceptions.

What training should I do before the event?

For a program designed by our sports therapy partner OA Centers for Orthopaedics, a Division of Spectrum Medical Group, please click here.

How can I find out about interest in sharing ride to Waterville?

BikeMaine offers a Rider Discussion Forum where riders looking to share a ride can connect.

If I drive to the start of BikeMaine, what do I do with my car?

BikeMaine has arranged with the city of Waterville  for on-site vehicle parking during the week for a $30 fee. This money offsets any costs associated with parking, with the remainder going to the host community.  Click here to pay for parking.  

Additionally, please print, fill out and bring this  Vehicle Parking Release and Waiver for Liability and Indemnity Agreement  with you.

Can I ship my bike?

Yes. Stay tuned for details. 

How difficult is the route?

Maine’s terrain is moderately challenging, with rolling hills and few flat stretches. 2019 daily rides average about 55 miles, with the shortest ride being 45 miles and the longest being about 68 miles. A rider can elect to extend the day’s riding with an approximately 15-mile marked loop at the end of some of the days’ routes. There is a layover day during the week when riders can rest, explore on foot, or put on some extra bike miles. With a good training plan in place, cyclists can meet the challenge. BikeMaine cyclists have ranged in age from 10 years old to 81 years young!

 

Getting to the Start

How do I get to the start of BikeMaine?

BikeMaine 2019 starts at the BikeMaine Village located at Head of Falls Park in Waterville, Maine. Waterville is located approximately 75 miles north of Portland.

By Car

To reach Waterville by car, follow Interstate 95, the primary highway in Maine, to Exit 127.

For those needing to leave a vehicle for the week, BikeMaine has arranged with the City of Waterville for on-site vehicle parking during the week for a $25 fee. This money offsets any costs associated with parking, with any excess being allocated to a local non-profit.

By Air

The two major airports that service Maine are the Portland International Jetport, located 75 miles from Waterville, and the Bangor International Airport, located 56 miles away.

BikeMaine is offering shuttles from the Portland International Jetport to the start of BikeMaine in Waterville on September 7, with a return shuttle on September 14. Please see Shuttles Between Portland or Bangor and Waterville, below, for information about the shuttle service.

By Bus

Bus transportation from Boston to Portland and/or Waterville is serviced by Concord Coach Lines. Once in Portland or Bangor, there is a BikeMaine shuttle to Waterville. Please see Shuttles Between Portland or Bangor and Waterville, below, for information about the shuttle.

By Train

Transportation on Amtrak can be booked from Boston through to Portland. Once in Portland, there is a BikeMaine shuttle to Waterville. Please see Shuttles Between Portland or Bangor and Waterville, below, for information about the shuttle.

Shuttles Between Portland and Waterville

There will be a shuttle service available for BikeMaine 2019, leaving from the Hilton Garden Inn, and the Portland International Jetport. The shuttle we depart at approximately 11:00 am on September 7th, and provide transport to the BikeMaine village at Head of Falls Park in Waterville, approximately 75 miles away.

The shuttle will provide transport from the BikeMaine village in Waterville back to Portland on September 14th, departing at approximately 4:00 pm. The cost of the shuttle is $150, round trip. Riders requesting shuttle service must notify BikeMaine by August 1st. Specific details about shuttle pick-up and drop-off times will be provided following the close of the shuttle request period on August 1.

During the Ride

What if someone needs to reach me in an emergency?

In extreme emergencies, family members can contact a rider by calling the Maine State Police in Augusta at 1-800-452-4664. Please ask them to send an urgent message to BikeMaine officials. Keep in mind that it may take up to 4 hours to locate a rider and relay a message.

Will you transport my medical device?

Yes. BikeMaine will transport necessary medical devices. Please email or call 207-623-4511 and ask for the BikeMaine staff so that we can discuss your particular situation and be able to plan accordingly.

Riders can place their C-PAP machine or other medical device in the designated container at the BikeMaine Information Booth before 8:30 a.m. each day and pick it up in the next host community between 3:00 – 6:30 p.m. from the designated container at the Information Booth.

Please note that BikeMaine offers this service as a courtesy and does not assume responsibility for any device.

Will I have phone/e-mail access during the ride? Will there be a way for me to charge electronic devices?

No promises here. We’re traveling in rural sections of the state where signals can be intermittent. There’s better opportunity for connectivity in host communities, but again, no guarantees. In each host community, a service organization will offer an on-site charging station for electronics for a small fee.

What happens if I can’t finish the day’s ride?

Each cyclist is expected to ride from one host community to the next. There are support vehicles on the course each day, but they are not intended to be a shuttle service. They are available to transport cyclists as needed due to mechanical problems or physical injury. The vans also have extra water and snacks, if needed. If at any time you need assistance, signal a support vehicle with a €œthumbs down€ hand gesture. If you do get in a support vehicle, you will be transported to the next rest stop, and eventually to the next BikeMaine Village. Support vehicles usually wait until they are full before heading to the Village.

Do I need to finish riding each day by a specific time?

Route support services are available only during course hours, from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. BikeMaine riders still on the route at 4:30 p.m. will be offered a ride to the day’s destination. BikeMaine can only provide route support to participants who are riding on the established route during the time the route is open.

How much money should I expect to spend?

While there are not many times you will need to spend money along the way, there are plenty of opportunities when you may want to spend money. You will need to purchase the first 3 meals when we are in the layover community, where there are a variety of restaurants and markets to satisfy a range of tastes and budgets. As for wants, consider the following extras: pre-breakfast coffee and end of the day beer, wine, or other treats; massages; BikeMaine merchandise and other retail purchases; equipment repair; cell phone charging; local attractions; and for those who seek assistance in carrying luggage from the truck to the tent site, contributions to the local service organization that helps you (a $2 tip per bag is recommended).

ATMs are available in most host communities, but not necessarily near the Village sites. Stopping at an ATM along the route if needed or carrying cash is a good idea.

What if I wake up and I don’t feel able to ride?

There will be a support vehicle available each morning to transport cyclists from site to site if a cyclist is experiencing illness or injury. You will need a medical note to ride in this vehicle, which you can get at the Medical Tent. Bring the form to the Information Tent before 8:00 a.m. to sign-up for the transport.

What types of food do you serve?

BikeMaine, in partnership with the Maine Farm and Sea Cooperative, prides itself on using locally grown, in-season food at all its meals. When registering, riders are asked to select an omnivore or vegetarian menu. At each meal, two main dishes are served – one with meat and one without. A variety of salads and side dishes also are offered. While many of the dishes offered may be gluten free, we cannot certify that they are completely free of all traces of gluten. Please contact the Ride Director if you have questions about handling food allergies.

Does every town have a laundromat?

Laundromats are located within a mile of the BikeMaine Village in Waterville, Damariscotta (Day 2), Rockland (Day 3 & 4), and Belfast (Day6). There will be no laundry service readily availible in Hope, at Alford Lake Camp (Day 1), so please plan accordingly.

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The Maine Cyclist

Read the latest issue of the bicycling and pedestrian magazine of Maine.

Ride Details 2019

By | BikeMaine
Bike Maine 2019 Coastal Connections logo
L.L.Bean logo

Ride With Us

The Kennebec River is magical, rising from Moosehead Lake and cascading to the Atlantic Ocean. And where there’s a river there’s usually a valley…and this one’s spectacular. We’ll ride through the southern portion of the Kennebec Valley, as we’ll connect to Midcoast Maine.

There are few places on the East Coast where you can hike a mountain and, with a turn of your head, shift your eyes from terra firma to a sparkling sea and enchanted islands below. Maine’s Midcoast is one such place. Tucked within the Maine coastline are picturesque villages that bloom to vibrant waterfronts where Maine’s foodie scene continues to flourish. We’ll spent a good portion of the week exploring those seaside villages.

Explore each day of the ride, and start dreaming of your perfect Maine escape on two wheels!

September 7, 2019

Arrive at the BikeMaine village in Waterville to check in, get your bags weighed, and park your car for the week. Then get your campsite situated before heading to the Maine Beer Company beer garden to catch up with old BikeMaine friends, meet some new ones, and see what’s on tap for the week!

Please note: although there is no riding, all riders will be required to check in in person. You also won’t want to miss our first dinner, evening announcements and entertainment!

Waterville

The City of Waterville is located on the banks of the Kennebec River in Maine. Waterville is easily accessed by two exits off Interstate-95 as well as Route 201, a national, historic byway and part of the Kennebec-Chaudière Corridor.

Waterville takes great pride in its downtown, with seven structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Our downtown is home to many unique shops, one-of-a-kind eateries and a well attended farmers’ market with produce and products solely from local farmers and craft artisans.

Within our City limits you will find a unique mix of shops and restaurants, medical facilities, Thomas College and Colby College.

Visitors will enjoy numerous arts & cultural amenities, including the magnificent Waterville Opera House, Colby College Museum of Art, Redington Museum and the Railroad Square Cinema, which was recently touted as one of “The Best 5 Cinemas in New England” by Yankee Magazine. Waterville hosts a year round calendar of outstanding events, such as the Maine International Film Festival, Waterville Intown Arts Fest, Taste of Greater Waterville, and Downtown Waterville Farmers’ Market.

Shoppers will find an eclectic array of products, including upscale women’s clothing, home furnishings, jewelry, Maine-made products, toys and books and much more. Dining options are equally as diverse, offering authentic Lebanese, southern creole and Mexican cuisines, Asian specialties, assorted American fare, delicious pub food, and fresh seafood, not to mention great bagels, sandwiches and coffee.

Outdoor enthusiasts will delight over the miles of hiking trails located throughout the City, including those found at the four-season Quarry Road Recreation Area. Quarry Road also provides cross country skiing, snowshoeing and snow tubing in the winter months and biking, kayaking and walking opportunities in the spring, summer and fall. The Kennebec River also offers spectacular fishing and boating opportunities.

The City of Waterville is rich in history and traditions, making it a great place to live, visit or do business. To read a brief history of Waterville by Stephen Plocher, please click here. Or take a moment to check out our historic photo albums.

Waterville to Hope

The BikeMaine 2019 route begins in Waterville, crossing the Kennebec River via the historic Two Cent Bridge into Winslow, before swinging southeast into the rolling hills of rural Kennebec and Waldo Counties. We will skirt the north shore of China Lake—a favorite of anglers across the state—then criss-cross past several smaller ponds as we ride through the town of Palermo. Straightening out, the route continues through South Liberty and its surrounding farmland before crossing into Knox County and the town of Union, a cradle of early industry in the state and now home to the Matthews Museum of Maine Heritage and the annual Union Fair. We finish the day’s ride just around the corner in Hope, at the Alford Lake Camp.

  • Milage: 53.3
  • Elevation: 3,974 ft

Alford Lake Camp

Celebrating its 113th summer, Alford Lake Camp is one of the oldest residential girls camps in the world. ALC is located on the side of a hill on the east side of Alford Lake in Hope, Maine. The camps features over 300 acres of wide open fields, lakeside woods, and trails. Campers enjoy traditional tent living, with 37 wood frame tents nestled in the woods. Two washhouses on each end of the tent line have running water and electricity. The camp has facilities for activities such as tennis, horseback riding, sports, gymnastics, canoeing, sailing, swimming, climbing, drama, basket-weaving, ceramics, dance, and even a library. Crystal clear and very quiet, Alford Lake is one mile across and eight miles around. Alford Lake Camp stands out as an exceptional community that fosters friendship and citizenship, growth and respect, where campers learn a true “sense of self” through challenges and successes. We look forward to hosting Bike Maine as riders embrace their own challenges and success!

Hope to Damariscotta

This day will be one to remember. Leaving our camp behind, we will head west to Jefferson, before turning south to pedal along the eastern edges of Damariscotta Lake and Pemaquid Pond, and onto the historic Pemaquid Peninsula, home of some of the earliest and most embattled frontier settlements in New England. Awash in history and scenic beauty, we will pedal south through Broad Cove and out to Round Pond, a quaint village with a nicely protected and bustling harbor. We will turn back north at New Harbor and ride into Damariscotta, our home for the evening, at the Damariscotta River Association’s historic Round Top Farm.       

  • Milage: 68
  • Elevation: 3,760 ft

Damariscotta

The Damariscotta Region has rich history in shipbuilding, oysters and maritime traditions. Today, the vibrant downtown area of the Twin Villages of Damariscotta and Newcastle is bustling with shops, galleries and restaurants. A public boat launch in the municipal parking lot helps power this working waterfront with a renewed focus on oyster farming which has been a staple product from the the Damariscotta River for millennia.

The River is well‐known for boating, fishing, and a thriving aqua‐culture industry that produces both oysters and the sweet local mussels popular in area restaurants. Downtown Damariscotta is a vibrant mix of unique shops, community services, restaurants, the Lincoln Theatre, farmers’ markets, and artists’ galleries.

Damariscotta is also the gateway to the Pemaquid and Damariscotta Lakes Region, the Pemaquid Point Lighthouse featured on the Maine State Quarter, the colonial restoration at Fort William Henry, and provides access to the Atlantic Coast and Monhegan Island.

Damariscotta to Rockland

Day Three is a slight reprieve from the previous day’s ride, but showcases some of the most authentic communities in the Midcoast. The route winds north through Nobleboro before turning southeast and running parallel to a train line through Waldoboro, home of the famous Moody’s Diner. From there, riders zigzag their way to the coast through the farmlands of Whitney Corner to Warren—where you can still see remnants of 18th century canal locks—and finally a turn through Thomaston to Rockland’s Snow Marine Park. Riders will have the opportunity to rest and recuperate as we spend our layover day in Rockland.

  • Milage: 45
  • Elevation: 2,530 ft  

Rockland

Located on the beautiful clear waters of Penobscot Bay, Rockland offers something for everyone. This small city of 7,200 is increasingly known for its arts scene —  both fine art and culinary. It is home to world class museums, a wide range of galleries, craft breweries and award-winning restaurants. Stroll along the working waterfront and watch the fleet of lobster and herring boats come in, sail on an historic schooner, take a chocolate factory tour, explore the nearly mile long Rockland breakwater and lighthouse, or shop the historic downtown.

Rockland’s heart is its harbor, which supports a diverse mix of uses. Abenaki people called it Catawamteak, or “great landing place”. It was settled in 1769, and the area was incorporated as the City of Rockland in 1854. In its early years, the City grew rapidly with ship building and lime production. Over time, commercial fishing and tourism became and remain so to this day. In recent years, the City’s creative economy has taken off. Anchored by the Farnworth Art Museum and the Maine Center for Contemporary Art, Rockland is now known as the Arts Capital of Maine. Today’s Rockland is a vibrant mix of commercial, cultural and recreational activity and is increasingly popular as a place to live, work and play.

Rockland to Belfast

After a restful day, Thursday’s route begins with a trio of “Rocks.” An invigorating five-mile climb out of Rockland finally gives way to a descent into Rockville, then continues east through Beech Hill Preserve to Rockport. A short hike will allow riders to enjoy views from the top of Beech Hill, which is home to a sod-roofed cottage built in 1913. Passing through downtown Rockport, home to the historic Rockport Opera House, the route stays coastal for a stretch before swinging northeast in Camden, staying on scenic roads along the shores of magical Megunticook Lake. From there it is the now-familiar zigzag pattern, this time northeast towards Lincolnville, then northwest through Belmont, home of some climbs that are sure to be memorable. A long, rolling descent brings us to Belfast, our seaside home for two nights.

  • Milage: 55
  • Elevation: 4,520 ft

Belfast

In the spring of 1770 Belfast was settled by Scots-Irish families from Londonderry, New Hampshire. Legend has it that the name Belfast, after the Northern Ireland city, was chosen by a coin-toss. Fear of British attack led these original proprietors to abandon the settlement during the American Revolution, but they returned in the 1780s to build a vibrant, prosperous outpost that would become the market center for the outlying area.

Abundant timber, a gently sloping waterfront and proximity to varied agriculture gave rise to shipbuilding and maritime commerce, with fortunes made in both. Hundreds of wooden sailing ships were built by local shipyards and, during the 19th century, as much as 30% of the male population was employed in the maritime trades. Prosperous shipbuilders and merchants constructed the architecturally significant houses that dominate our residential neighborhoods today. Two disastrous fires consumed much of the downtown area in 1865 and 1873, but merchants rebuilt with brick, creating a pleasing and long-lasting commercial district. The Belfast Historic Districts, residential and commercial, are included on the National Register of Historic Places.

In 1962 Route 1, which had come straight through downtown via High Street, was rerouted around the city and across a new bridge. The rerouting was seen by some as the death knell for a once-vibrant shire town, but in hindsight the bypass preserved the city’s heart and soul and in the 1980s a rebirth began. Public and private investment restored some of the past luster. The arts flourished and the stately houses and commercial buildings were restored. In the early 90s USA Today named Belfast as one of America’s “culturally cool” communities. With the end of the poultry industry, Belfast once again reinvented itself and attracted a community of creative people, a University of Maine center, a large banking corporation, a shipyard and ever increasing numbers of tourists.

Today, Belfast is that rare combination of quiet small town with an active social and cultural life that is attractive to residents and visitors alike.

Belfast Loop

Our loop ride out of Belfast heads north around Swan Lake. Though Tchaikovsky will not be in attendance, our pedalers will want to leap for joy at the miles of farmland and forest beauty that awaits. A brisk 10-mile climb kicks off the day’s route, with a brief respite through the town of Waldo, historic source of much of Belfast’s shipbuilding timber. From there it’s rolling hills through Jackson and Monroe, rural outposts of Waldo County. The route then swings south, past the Winterport Dragway and Swan Lake State Park—a meditative ride through some highlands with views of the lake below. We connect back to the coast in Searsport, which was was, at a time in the mid-1800s, home to 10 percent of all American deepwater shipmasters. It’s now known for the Penobscot Marine Museum, which houses many relics of those days. A short jaunt from Searsport takes us back to Belfast and a well-established BikeMaine village.

  • Milage: 55
  • Elevation: 2,976 ft

Belfast to Waterville

We bid Belfast goodbye on Saturday and point our wheels west. This route takes us through some of the agricultural heartland of the Midcoast. A big morning climb through Montville and Freedom will show us loads of organic farming in action, as well as the famous Lost Kitchen, if you can find it! With the slopes of Frye Mountain behind us, a rolling descent leads back in to Kennebec County. We pass through Albion, where Johnny’s Selected Seeds got their start and still operates to this day. Waterville and the end of the week’s ride awaits, though you may be tempted to make a stop at Big G’s Deli in Fairfield before rolling back to the Head of Falls.

  • Milage: 54.8
  • Elevation: 3,242 ft

Bicycle Coalition of Maine Names 2018 BikeMaine Grant Recipients

By | BikeMaine, Coalition News, Featured Posts

The Bicycle Coalition of Maine today announced Main Street Skowhegan, Mahoosuc Pathways, and Kingfield Trail Builders as the recipients of this year’s BikeMaine Grants, funded by the proceeds from the organization’s annual cycling tour, BikeMaine.
“BikeMaine was conceived as an event that would use cycling as an economic benefit tool for local communities,” BikeMaine Ride Director MaryBeth Luce said. “The BikeMaine grants will directly support these organizations’ efforts to make their communities more bike and pedestrian friendly.”
Main Street Skowhegan will receive $10,000, Mahoosuc Pathways will receive $3,250, and Kingfield Trail Builders will receive $3,025 to fund their projects.
Main Street Skowhegan will use the funding to expand a 5-kilometer loop in the Run of River Whitewater Recreation Area so it can accommodate cyclists as well as pedestrians and become suitable for four-season use. Main Street Skowhegan Executive Director Kristina Cannon said the newly expanded loop will eventually incorporate a robust network of single-track off-road trails for mountain bikers, as well.
“Trail development is a major part of the proposed Run of River Recreation Area, and our intention is to grow our downtown trail system to 300 acres, an effort that will complement the future whitewater park in the Kennebec gorge,” Cannon said.
Mahoosuc Pathways Executive Director Gabe Perkins said his organization, based in Bethel, will apply the funding to the improvement of mountain bike trails at the Crescent Park School.
“We can’t think of too many elementary schools with sustainably designed and built mountain bike trails and that’s what made this project so attractive to us,” Perkins said. “Not only will it be a well built trail for students and community members, but it could also attract more people to our community who are looking at trail-based recreation as a deciding factor in where to relocate.”
Kingfield Trail Builders plans to use the grant money to improve non-motorized trails and trail connections, install shared bike-lane markings, and add bikes racks in key locations around Kingfield.
“Kingfield Trail Builders is thrilled to receive this grant from the Bicycle Coalition of Maine,” spokesperson Polly MacMichael said. “We are excited to partner with the Kingfield community as we work toward our goal to make Kingfield a safe and fun place for bicyclists and pedestrians alike.”
BikeMaine is a week-long celebration of Maine’s people, places, culture, and food, and moves to a different region of the state each year. BikeMaine 2018, the Bicycle Coalition of Maine’s signature event, takes place from Sept. 8 to Sept. 15. Dubbed Acadia In the St. John Valley – La Terre Entre Deux, this year’s event begins and ends in Presque Isle, with overnight stops in Caribou, Madawaska (two nights), Fort Kent (two nights), and St. Agatha.
The 2018 awards represent the third year of BikeMaine grant funding. The Town of Gardiner received the inaugural BikeMaine Grant, in the amount of $12,300, to fund the extension of the Cobbossee Trail, which connects the Kennebec River Trail to the town’s historic Cobbossee Corridor. The Washington County Council of Governments and the City of Bath received last year’s grants, which helped to fund bike repair kiosks along the Bold Coast Bikeway and a pump-track for Bath students, respectively.
Skowhegan and Kingfield were host communities for last year’s BikeMaine event, and Bethel was a BikeMaine host community for the 2015 BikeMaine event.

On Bike to Work Day, News Breaks That Maine Gov. Paul LePage Was Hit By a Car While Biking in Florida

By | BikeMaine, Coalition News, Featured Posts, Our Position

Today was Bike to Work Day, and Maine Gov. Paul LePage revealed that he needs shoulder surgery after being struck by a car while he was bicycling in Florida.

When the news broke this morning that Gov. Paul LePage would need shoulder surgery because he’d been hit by a car while bicycling in Florida, our entire staff was out celebrating National Bike to Work Day, encouraging and supporting people who made the choice to commute today by bike instead of driving.
We were, each of us, stunned – and thankful that he wasn’t hurt more seriously. And we were struck by the obvious: this news was breaking on Bike to Work Day.
Gov. LePage is an experienced cyclist. We know this because we’re publishing an interview with him in the next issue of our membership magazine, The Maine Cyclist, in which he talks about how and why he loves to ride.
Beyond that, at the beginning of April the governor recognized us with the Maine Office of Tourism’s Originality Award, and he was on hand at the awards luncheon in Portland to personally bestow the honors. The award recognized our BikeMaine event for its success in boosting economic development by promoting Maine as a destination for bicycle tourism. Before things got underway, we got a chance to chat with him a bit about cycling.
 

Maine Gov. Paul LePage presents the Maine Office of Tourism’s Originality Award to MaryBeth Luce, the Coalition’s BikeMaine Event Director, at the Governor’s Tourism Conference in Portland in April 2018.

He warmed to the topic, and talked in detail about how he loved riding in Jackman when he was younger. But it wasn’t just what he said that rang true, it was how he said it. He got that look in his eye, you know the one; the one that all cyclists get when they’re talking about their favorite rides with someone who’s actually interested and gets it. For the governor, it’s clear that cycling is a very personal thing, and that he is a committed and experienced cyclist.
So here’s our takeaway from all this: if an experienced cyclist like the governor, who apparently was not riding in anything other than a completely legal fashion, can be so casually knocked off his bicycle by a passing motorist, perhaps we’re not doing everything we can to protect cyclists, pedestrians, and other vulnerable users of our roadways.
Right now, our transportation infrastructure overwhelmingly favors the automobile, to the point where other modes of transportation seem to be little more than eccentricities that are benevolently indulged by planners and policy makers.
And yet, time and time again, it’s made clear that people value communities that are bikeable and walkable, qualities that are often at the top of the list when they’re looking for a place to live or work. The crash that injured the governor happened in Florida, but similar crashes happen all too frequently in Maine because the fact is, our transportation infrastructure does not reflect that priority.
We can do better. And if we’re truly committed to making our state a destination for bicycle tourism – if Maine truly is open for bicycle tourism business – we must.

Bold Support for BikeMaine

By | BikeMaine, Coalition News, Featured Posts
BikeMaine 2017 riders drinking Bold Coast Coffee in Skowhegan, Maine.

A pair of BikeMaine 2017 riders enjoy some Bold Coast Coffee on Day One of BikeMaine 2017 in Skowhegan, Maine.

Cyclists and coffee have a long and storied history together because, for a cyclist, coffee is critical.
We get that, and when we were planning BikeMaine 2016: Discover the Bold Coast, we knew we needed a source for coffee, preferably local, who got it, too – and could provide coffee for 450 people for a week! So when we found a coffee roaster in East Machias who not only got that connection, but actually embraced it, we were ecstatic.
BikeMaine is a week-long, rolling celebration of Maine’s people, places, culture and food; Bold Coast Coffee is the only specialty coffee roaster on the Bold Coast. They feature rare and affordable, responsibly sourced beans from the finest Central and South American farms (including their own farm in Tarrazu) and they create some amazing blends – such as a custom blend for BikeMaine called BikeMaine Peaks.
“Bicycling is such a dynamic and personal way to truly experience a region,” Troy Quimby, Bold Coast Coffee founder and CEO, said. “When the Coalition announced that the BikeMaine 2016 ride would be ‘Discover the Bold Coast’, we just knew it was something we wanted to support.”
Support is one thing. What we got from Bold Coast Coffee was something else altogether.
In addition to donating a week-long supply of coffee for 450 riders and crew, 24/7, Bold Coast Coffee also offered to contribute 50 cents from the sale of every pound of the BikeMaine Peaks to fund our ongoing, statewide work to make Maine better for biking and walking.

Bold Coast Coffee mugs ready to go at BikeMaine 2016: Discover The Bold Coast.

And, lo and behold, a few days ago this message hit our email inbox:

Bold Coast is very happy to present BikeMaine with our … $0.50 per pound donation … a check for $704.50. Thank you for all the wonderful things you and the Bicycle Coalition of Maine are doing for our state.
Best,
Troy Quimby

Thank you, Bold Coast Coffee, for your support. We couldn’t ask for a better partner. You were with us at BikeMaine 2016: Discover the Bold Coast. You were with us at BikeMaine 2017: Pathway to the Peaks; and we’re glad to have you on board again for BikeMaine 2018: Acadia in the St. John Valley in Aroostook County. See you there.
The BikeMaine Peaks roast is still available at www.BoldCoastCoffee.com, but will only be for a few more months, when they will debut the 2018 offering. (It’s rumored to be something French.) In the meantime, enjoy 20 percent off site-wide using code BikeMaine17.